How Preschool Songs Help Your Child Learn

How Preschool Songs Help Your Child Learn

We have all had the experience of listening to the radio when a song comes on that you haven’t heard in 10, 15, or 20 years. But right away you start to sing along like you heard it yesterday, you don’t miss a single word. Amazing right. Well not really. You probably heard it a hundred times in it’s hay day. Repetition.

Kids are no different. Those songs like Wheels on the Bus and The Itsy Bitsy Spider help your child learn simple concepts through repetition. Singing along to these simple songs helps them to become familiar with new words and concepts. The Old McDonald song helps young children learn the sounds that animals make and there are songs that help with numbers and colors.

Singing also helps young children feel confident and less shy around the other children. And when you add fun hand motions and wiggles to the song the kids really come to life. And if you really want to add some spice, give children some simple musical instruments. Tamboreens, bells and bongos and kazoos are very easy for children to use and they absolutely love to play them. Exposing them to music at an early age is will encourage their love for music as they grow.

Music is a magical gift that should nourished and cultivated at an early age, especially now that scientific evidence proves that
children who have been exposed to music at an early age make better math and science students later on. Medical and health-care research has also shown evidence that there is a link between music and singing and good health and healing. Children that sing are less likely to be overly stressed and have a more positive emotional profile.

The evidence is compelling that music and singing have a positive impact on all aspects of child learning and development.



True American Patriot

True American Patriot


A TRUE AMERICAN PATRIOT SPEAKS OUT
By Bill Gallagher
It ain’t fair, John Sinclair
In the stir for breathing air.
Won’t you care for John Sinclair
In the stir for breathing air?
— John Lennon, 1971.

DETROIT — Those were the days of Nixonian madness — the hopeless war in Vietnam, the illegal invasion of Cambodia, riots on college campuses, secret police, break-ins, enemies lists, IRS audits, the White House leak-plugging “plumbers unit,” and on and on. But Nixon’s paranoia, crimes, abuses of power, trampling on civil liberties and the Constitution are tame, almost benign, by the standards of the Bushevik regime.

“These guys make Nixon look like a Cub Scout,” says John Sinclair, a poet, musician, journalist, veteran radical, cultural icon and professional disturber of the establishment peace. The native of Davison, Mich., near Flint, became an international cause celebre in 1969 when a fascist-leaning judge sentenced him to 10 years in prison for possessing two marijuana joints. “They gave him 10 for two,” John Lennon wrote in his song about Sinclair’s draconian sentence.

The sentence — right out of Stalin’s guidelines — had nothing to do with the gravity of his offense, but had everything to do with his political views. Sinclair founded the White Panther Party and included among his radical and freethinking friends Allen Ginsberg, Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin and Timothy Leary. He, along with photographer Leni Arndt, his partner and later wife, organized the Detroit Artists’ Workshop, a communal group of artists from all disciplines.

His love of music further branded John as a dangerous subversive and put him under the eyes of the FBI creeps J. Edgar Hoover assigned to watch every move he made. Sinclair used music as a conduit for his poetry. Until his imprisonment, he was the manager and Svengali of legendary Detroit rockers the MC5, who made sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll a national pastime.

It was for his thoughts, poems, music, politics and passion that Sinclair was deemed a dangerous enemy of Nixonian Amerika, and he paid a horrible price for his revolutionary ways.

Sinclair did hard time for his soft crime at Michigan’s infamous Jackson State Prison. “Jack Town” was, and still is, a hellhole, the largest walled prison on earth, an American gulag where the goal is to degrade and dehumanize the inmates and expect that society will improve as a result. Sinclair spent his time reading and writing, but most of all just surviving.

I met Sinclair on Thursday, Dec. 8, the 25th anniversary of John Lennon’s murder. We met at Agave, a fine Mexican restaurant near the campus of Wayne State University. His presence in Detroit on that day was entirely serendipity. He was in town for a poetry reading and concert at the university honoring the poets and music of Katrina-battered New Orleans, a town Sinclair loves and where he lived for 10 years.

I asked where he lives now.

“Amsterdam, for obvious reasons,” he replied, with a laugh and a twinkle in his eye. But his voice softened and his eyes moistened when we talked about John Lennon.

“I always remember him on this date every year. It was so close to the date where our lives intersected, because it was Dec. 10 when he came here to Ann Arbor and got me out of prison,” Sinclair said.

He shook his head, thinking about his friend John Lennon.

“For any artist to be assassinated in his prime, on his way home from work, going into his home, it’s horrifying. For it to be a guy like John Lennon, who represented and believed in peace, love and communications between human beings, probably more than anyone else in the music world, you just shudder to think of this,” he said.

Sinclair had been rotting in Jackson State Prison for nearly three years when his life intersected with John Lennon’s. Sinclair’s lawyers had challenged his sentence and the constitutionality of Michigan’s marijuana laws. The case went before the Michigan Supreme Court and Sinclair won, but a lower court refused to grant an appeal bond, claiming he was a “danger to society.” He remained in prison.

Friends and supporters organized a rally at the Chrisler Arena on the campus of the University of Michigan set for Dec. 10, 1971. The organizers hoped the “Free John Now Rally” would be a major event, drawing attention to the grave injustice that kept Sinclair locked up.

But filling the 15,000-seat arena worried Sinclair.

“So I was very concerned. I thought it would be awful if we staged this huge thing and nobody came, and then they’d say, ‘Oh, man, this guy ain’t nowhere. Nobody cares about him,'” Sinclair recalled.

Then, one of his lawyers from Ann Arbor visited Sinclair at Jackson and told him about a surprising phone call he had just gotten.

Sinclair’s lawyer told him, “Oh, man, I really got good news. John Lennon is going to come. He’s written a song for you.”

Sinclair scoffed at the claim, saying, “Man, don’t mess with me. I’m already at my wits’ end here.”

The lawyer went back to his office, called Lennon, tape recorded his offer to help, then went back to the prison the next day and played it for Sinclair.

“It was just unbelievable. You’re in prison. People in prison are pretty much abandoned. Abandon all hope, ye who enter here,” Sinclair laughed.

Lennon showed up and sang his new song “John Sinclair” to a sold-out crowd.

“Immediately, the whole complexion of my situation changes,” Sinclair recalled. “Instead of people saying, ‘Why doesn’t he just shut up and serve his 10 years?’ all of a sudden, they’re saying, ‘Well, jeeze, John Lennon says this is wrong; maybe we ought to think about this. You know, the Beatles are coming here to look into this guy’s case.’ Everything changed. Ten days later, I was out. It was like a miracle.”

Out of the slammer, Sinclair went to New York to meet and thank John Lennon.

“He wasn’t above anyone, even though he was probably the greatest popular creative artist in the world at the time. He was just a regular guy, a beautiful cat. We hit it off pretty good.”

Lennon and Sinclair thought of a project to go on a concert tour following Nixon on his 1972 re-election campaign. They’d sell tickets for three bucks and give the money to community organizations.

“The poor guy wanted to have songs, and tell people to make peace. You know, really ugly stuff like that,” Sinclair said. But J. Edgar Hoover’s FBI and Attorney General John Mitchell’s Justice Department were going to put a stop to those plans. Hoover and Mitchell, both serial felons, by the way, got the Immigration and Naturalization Service to tell Lennon and his wife, Yoko Ono, both foreign nationals, that they were going to have visa problems unless they stopped mixing politics with pop music. “First, the government hounded him out of public life. And then, when he decided to come back, some nut blew him away,” Sinclair said. “You just shudder to think of this. He was my age. He would have had another 25 years of productivity, genius, works of art. It’s so sad.”

Sinclair finds the violence and gun culture of America appalling.

“You’d think, at one point, they’d rethink the concept of everybody being armed. It’s so stupid. And now they’re taking this kind of thuggery to an international level,” he said.

Sinclair believes Lennon would have found the Bushevik regime “frightening,” and if he were alive, he would be doing everything he could to end the war in Iraq. Sinclair finds Bush’s appeal and ability to sell the war in Iraq disgusting and more harmful than Vietnam.

“This is the worst, in my view. This is the one that took America out of the realm of civilized nations and put us in with Hitler, bliztkrieging some poor little nation because you want their oil. Lying. It’s just so ugly. How long are the American people going to put up with this?” he said.

Sinclair watched the BBC in Europe as American democracy unraveled in the 2000 presidential election.

“It was frightening to me. You expect the right wing to do bad things. You don’t expect the people to endorse this and cheer them on. You expect them to have more sense. This is a democratic country with a long history of intelligent, informed citizenry, and now they don’t have a clue,” he said.

We talked about the mainstream media, the American Pravda that helped sell Bush’s war in Iraq and failed to question the phony reasons for invading the country. But beyond the propaganda, Sinclair sees a disturbing need in the American people for a leader with such horrible traits and instincts.

“I finally understand what Hitler was all about,” Sinclair said, sipping black coffee. “You know, all my life I wondered, how did Germany let this little weird guy gain power? How did they give him everything? He spoke to something in them and that’s what this guy does. He doesn’t speak to me. I look at him and can’t believe someone would follow him across the street. But they like this guy for some reason. He gives them what they want and I don’t understand it. I guess I’ve lost any understanding of mass psychology.”

Sinclair still performs with his band, the Blues Scholars, and he loves traveling around the country in an Amtrak train. He hosts a weekly radio show from Amsterdam on the Internet at www.RadioFreeAmsterdam.com. It’s also available as a podcast, and his radio show archives are found at www.johnsinclair.us.

“I’ve never been a big fan of the way our country organizes itself socially. I think that’s on the record,” he chuckled, “but now more than ever. That’s why I spend most of my time in Amsterdam. It’s the opposite of here.”

Sinclair acknowledges Europe has “right-wing religious fanatics.” But unlike the fundamentalist Christianity the Busheviks are trying to impose as a state religion, the European zealots “aren’t trying to get into your home. They really don’t care what you do in your bedroom. They don’t really care what you do to alter the inside of your head, which is as it should be, in my view. And they aren’t armed.”

Touring with the Blues Scholars is a haven for Sinclair. “I present a moving target,” he said. His beard is gray these days and he’d love to experience another miracle like a MacArthur grant or the appearance of some wise and inspired patron to help fund his work and art. His laugh is hearty and contagious. But he is perplexed and saddened that the nation and culture he began challenging more than 40 years ago is in the worst state of his lifetime.

Asked about Lennon’s song, Sinclair said, “I light up. I love to hear that song. The ironic thing about it is, I’m a blues man. It’s about the closest thing to a blues song he ever made, with the snare drum and slide guitar. So I enjoy it on several levels. But most of all, it was my ticket to freedom.”



The World Does NOT Revolve Around You

The World Does NOT Revolve Around You

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Source: Flickr


“Listen, you spoiled little cretins, the world does not revolve around you,” I patiently explained.

“You’re kidding right?” hooted my students derisively.

“Pick up your instruments, start together on the downbeat and count carefully.”

How many music teachers have had the first part of that conversation? Almost none, at least not out loud. The second installment is an every day plea for many.

Our youth-obsessed culture seems to make a liar out of me, but lest you think your work is in vain, let me present you with a few ideas.

One of the things adults commonly complain about in their later years looking back on school, aside from a lousy prom, was that they felt ‘alone’ and like an ‘outsider’. The band and orchestra students that I have canvassed don’t often feel that way. Isn’t that interesting? I’m lobbying to have my son do a graduate research project on this issue. I’d love to see the results, wouldn’t you?

Common sense, that harbinger of things ‘everybody knows’ insists that if you learn to be part of a group that needs you in order to get something done, you will feel valuable and worthwhile. Anecdotal evidence supports this concept.

Our sports-mad country feeds us with stories of the scrawny child who becomes Mr. Olympia seven times, makes multimillions in movies and then governs California. What is often overlooked is that music serves many valuable parts of the maturation process that sports do not.

Let me elaborate briefly. Most people involved with music know the statistics. Music makes you brighter, helps you focus in all areas of study, gives you greater mastery over fractions than heretofore thought humanly possible, etc.

But here’s a thought for all those guitar players strumming alone in their garrets. When you have to listen and fit in, when there is the tyranny of a written part to play you are going to find yourself learning new musical concepts at light speed. Why? For the same reason that learning say, mathematics, is easier with some formal guidelines. Reinventing multiplication or discovering every formula newly takes a few lifetimes of inquiry, just check your history texts. Solitary inquiry is necessary and good and I hope it has a place of honor in everyone’s intellectual pantheon, but it cannot be the only method of realization.

One thing ensemble music instruction teaches you is that you must ‘make nice’ with others in order to get the job done. “So what?” you say. It gets back to the heart of both of our issues.

One of the signs of maturity, which my adorable dumplings in the lower grades find difficult to exhibit, is one’s place and involvement in an activity. In spite of what our youth worshipping culture and media would have you believe individuals are generally not the most important things on the program. In music you learn that you can have a part that is vital to the results, but so are the other parts. Together you all help to create a whole that is satisfying to everyone.

This is something that musicians learn and team players discover, but many other people miss completely. Unlike sports where there can be a competitive factor to be the ‘best’, music requires everyone be good to make the whole creative performance satisfying. This is an even higher level of sophistication than sports because creating your part well and thoroughly gives you no personal glory but makes the whole experience better for all the other players and the audience. And all without someone else having to ‘lose’.

A good musician must practice alone but still be able to play with a group to create something larger than themselves. The product of this collaboration? All of us have favored pieces of music associated with the times
of our lives, and a majority of those pieces were created within a group, rather than by a solo artist.

Both musician and listener profit from this synergy. With recordings you can hear your favorites repeatedly extending the memories for a lifetime. So, although the world doesn’t revolve around any one of us, the extended fruits of our conspiracies are definitely worth striving for. Go forth and make music for yourself and for all of us.



Giving People High Quality Shows for Many Years

Giving People High Quality Shows for Many Years

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Source: Flickr

It is a fact that people crave for entertainment. Because of this, people have created theaters where performance artists act, sing, and do whatever talent they have on stage in order to entertain other people.

For centuries, theatrical stages have existed throughout the world. In ancient Rome, amphitheaters and coliseums were erected to entertain its citizens with games, as well as fights. In fact, Rome created one of the largest coliseums where gladiator fights were held.

There were also amphitheaters where musicals and interpretations were held.

Today, performing arts centers are now one of the best providers of entertainment. With talented artists from all over the world showcasing their productions, and their talent, you can be sure that your family will be entertained to the max. It will be able to showcase ballet, musicians at their finest, as well as musicals and stage acting or stage drama. Whatever you are looking for in entertainment, you can be sure that you will be able to find it in performing arts centers near you.

Most productions today are so prestigious that only the best will be allowed to perform on stage on some of the leading performing arts centers in the world.

Just don’t expect to see real gladiators fighting for their lives as civilizations today are more civil and moral. Just expect to see high quality acting with actors clad in costumes. You will also be able to see recitals from a budding performing artist as well as great shows from professional performing artists.

In performing arts centers, you will also be able to see concerts from the best bands today.

Most prestigious performing arts centers today also offer performing arts education for young kids who are willing and are talented. With this program, you will be able to get your kids interested in music, dancing or singing. So, if you see that your child has a potential in becoming one of the best performing artists, you might want to try and enroll them to this kind of educational program. With the professionals working hard to educate children, you can be sure that you child or children will be able to hone their skills and will definitely be able to perform at their best.

For example, if your child is very talented in playing the piano, or wants to go ballet dancing, you can be sure that by letting them join a performing arts center educational program, they will be able to have fun enhancing their skills.

These are the things that you need to remember about a performing arts center.

One example of a performing arts center that offers high quality education about the arts is the Juilliard School of Music. This is by far the most prestigious music school in the world and will definitely be able to get your child to become one of the most talented artists in the world.

However, you should keep in mind that in this school, only the best among the best is chosen for scholarship.

There are quite a lot of performing arts center in the United States today. From California to New York, you will be able to see a performing arts center almost everywhere in the United States.

So, if you want to enjoy high quality entertainment, you might want to visit the nearest performing arts center in your area.



Making Your Own Music: Songwriting Basics

Making Your Own Music: Songwriting Basics

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Source: Flickr

Whether you are a teenager or are well into your golden years, it is never too late to explore your creative side, especially if you are interested in music. Songwriting is an excellent way to express your thoughts and feelings and to communicate them to your friends and family, even if you have no aspirations of musical fame or fortune. If you are interested in selling or performing your songs, however, you should be aware that it is a hard road and that very few songwriters achieve great fame or fortune, and especially not instantly. Nonetheless, if you have realistic expectations, you will find that writing music is a worthwhile experience whether it is a hobby or a profession.

People write songs in many different ways. Some writers compose the music first, while others first write the words. For some, the words and the melody come to them at the same time, while others write the melodies first and write the words last. No matter what order you are comfortable with, you will eventually have to decide what the song is about. There are a variety of different types of songs ranging from songs that tell fictional stories to songs that communicate deep personal feelings.

If you decide to write a story song, a good first exercise is to write about a news story or about something you’ve read in the newspaper. That way you can use your first song to hone your word choosing skills without the pressure of coming up with your own story. However, if you already have an idea for a story to tell, you can write it out in poem form and try to make appropriate rhymes and structures that help communicate what happens in the song.

Because music is so expressive, many songwriters use their compositions to express how they feel, whether it be about a person or a situation or even geographic location. Writing these types of songs can be highly personal, so every person does it differently. When you have a strong feeling about something, write it down in a notebook and come back to it later. You might think of a good line that expresses an emotion really well, and if you remember it you might be able to build an entire song around it. Having quiet time to think is always helpful when you are trying to write a song.

Writing the actual music for a song can be done in many different ways depending on your musical prowess and your focus. If you write mostly to communicate words, then a few well-chosen guitar chords might be all of the accompaniment you need. However, if you a instrumental virtuoso, your approach to writing music will be quite different. Many people think of a musical idea and play it over and over again until they think of a melody. Often times, songwriters will construct whole pieces, melody and all, without even knowing what the song is going to be about. Once the melody is complete, the writer will sit down and think about lyrics that fit the feeling behind the music and will go from there.

Once you have put together your words and music, you might feel the need to perform your new song. It is always a good idea to play for friends and family first before trying to play to a crowd. When you feel comfortable enough playing your song, you should consider visiting an open mic night at a local coffeehouse or bar. At open mic nights, songwriters can play one or more of their songs to an appreciative and attentive audience. Performers can discuss their craft with other writers, making it a fun way to learn more about the writing process.



A Fine Piano Music Box Is A Work Of Art

A Fine Piano Music Box Is A Work Of Art

Music boxes have always come in all shapes and sizes. Some are small enough to fit in your hand, while others are designed to hold jewelry, and still others are large enough to stand alone like a piece of furniture. Wood, metal, glass, and stone; jewelry boxes are familiar to all of us. Equally familiar is the musical jewelry box. In fact, it is almost rare to see one without the other. A piano music box is another variation on that theme, and what a unique and intriguing variation it is!

A piano music box is exactly that; a music box shaped like a piano. But its appeal extends well beyond its familiar shape and the songs it plays. Some piano music boxes are simple enough; the least expensive models are often just a standard music box inside a case that resembles a piano. And like many other music boxes, they often have room to hold trinkets and jewelry. But it is the expensive, hand crafted models that are so unique and interesting, they have to be seen to be believed.

Often imported from Europe, a hand crafted piano music box is a work of art. Hand carved, hand-painted, and inlaid with rare stones, piano music boxes can often cost hundreds of dollars or more. The lids of these miniature grand pianos lift and reveal the musical movement, which is the heart of the musical instrument, just like a real baby grand. The musical movement on a piano music box is just as impressive as the case in which it sits.

A high quality piano music box can be custom ordered with a musical movement that fits your needs. A basic musical movement might be capable of playing eighteen notes, and that would allow a piano music box that is outfitted with that movement to play simple songs that are short in duration. As you progress in price in sophistication, the musical possibilities become greater and greater. The most expensive musical movements are capable of up to one-hundred and forty-four notes. This allows a piano music box to play intricate songs that last much longer than the more basic movements allow. Naturally, the list of available songs becomes quite long when your piano music box is outfitted with the finest musical movements.

A piano music box is something that is sure to bring joy to its owner, and it is equally likely to be passed down as a family heirloom. Its ultimate appeal lies in the fact that it is so much like its full sized counterpart. Its beautiful woodwork and beautiful sound make a piano music box more than just a music box; it is a work of art.



Ringtones

Ringtones

AMA UK 2019 - Conference Day 3 -7509
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A quick Google search will produce countless articles trying to understand the popularity of ‘ringtones’; hundreds of bloggers waxing lyrical on the benefits of personalising their cell phones. Interviews with “experts” profering sexy theories about ringtones and identity construction lend an academic seriousness to the Crazy Frog phenomena. The figures are pretty serious too, in the U.S.A. alone, the Yankee Group predicts, ringtones will be worth $500 million. That’s roughly the GDP of Fiji.
Obviously our cell phones needs a voice, but does that voice need to be a polyphonic adaptation of ‘Living on a Prayer’?
The latest figures indicate that young people are the greatest consumers of mobile music. According to one UK survey, 15-24 year olds account for 80% of ringtone spending. Studies by Nick Anderson of Sussex University show that young people are far more aware of the “brand personalty” (the particular identity affiliated with certain brands) than older generations. Anderson suggests that teenagers can deduce a person’s character, likes and dislikes, by their branded possessions. Considering the amount of branding in the music industry, it’s not unreasonable to say that popular musicians have their own “brand personality”. So, your 50 Cent ringtone, for example, communicates not only a your taste in music, but also your compliance to the whole ‘Fiddy’ meme. Ultimately, for brand savvy youth, this says something about your personality, which, you hope, everybody within earshot understands.
If a cell phone rings in the woods but nobody is around to hear it, are you still down with 50 Cent? Ringtones are about personalization, and about public performance. The publicness of the ringtone is an integral part of its appeal. It’s unlikely that anyone would have a ringtone on their landline. In a noisy urban soundscape like the city, silence is an anomaly. Personalised ringtones are simply another irritating sound in the hullabaloo. Most of us manage tune out the sounds imposed on us: muzak, hawkers, traffic, the O’Reily factor, so why try and impose yet another squawk? Perhaps the ringtone is the audio equivalent of territorial pissing; thirty seconds in which YOU pick the soundtrack. For a few moments when your cell phone rings the 50 Cent meme is the most powerful in the sonic environment. Where “Fiddy” is relatively redundant as a social force, certain ringtones allow citizens to demonstrate their dissatisfaction or support of a cause. Independent radio station WFMU have created a variety of anti- George W. Bush ringtones available for download, while engadget.com allows users to choose their preferred presidential candidate ringtone. Condemning other commuters to several cycles of 50 Cent, the theme from ‘Star Wars’ or a Dubya quote demonstrates your individual tastes and allows others distinguish you as either nemesis or brethren.
In our efforts to relieve poverty, impede environmental disaster or cure the global AIDs epidemic, ringtones are totally and utterly useless. When it comes to enforcing the myth that every individual is special, the artificial uniqueness of a personalized ringtone is just the ticket. Paradoxically, this demonstration of individualism is only really effective in a crowd. As far as this writer’s concerned the real purpose of ringtones lies in their ridiculousness. A recent gathering of sensible adults turned to hilarity thanks to an improvised game of “Name that tune”. Using Foovely’s ringtone preview function, those gathered took turns choosing snippets of songs for the party to guess. Recognising a song in 30 seconds is SO much harder in monophone!



Audition Tips You Never Knew

Audition Tips You Never Knew

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As the number of people auditioning for the hit television series American Idol can certainly prove the amount of competition is increasing.
This means that it is necessary to show up to the audition fully prepared to show exactly what you are capable of doing, and minimize any insecurity that you have. Your ultimate goal is to always walk away with one of the coveted Golden Tickets, but the reality is that they are hard to come by. This means taking as much time as possible to learn how to handle yourself during the audition to get the absolute best reception from the judges possible.

One of the best things you can do to prepare yourself for a singing career is using a vocal coach and taking vocal lessons. Even the professional singers all work with talented vocal coaches. You need to learn how to talk, how to breathe, how to control your voice, and how to improve your skill level continuously. Very seldom do you ever find a professional singer who does not continue to work with a vocal coach. This means that it is critical that as an amateur you work to improve your vocal skills continuously. Just remember, this is not the time to be cheap, you need to locate a good quality vocal coach that has a track record of success.

A second tip to follow is you should select your song months in advance and practice repeatedly. Practice until you know the words forwards, backwards and sideways. You do not want to be the one contestant that forgets the words to their song in the middle. The more you practice the better you will know the lyrics and the less likely stress is to cause you to forget the words. An additional benefit to practicing so much is you will be comfortable with the flow of the song, and have ample time to ensure that you can select a new song in the event that you have too many complications with your first song.

Speaking of song selection it is a good idea to have at least two songs that you are prepared to sing on audition day. This means two full songs, not one song that you fully know, and one that you know a little. You need two songs that you know fully so that you can properly perform the second song if requested. There are occasions that warrant a contestant singing more than a single song, being prepared for this situation will ensure that if it does occur, you are properly prepared for it.

Your fourth tip is pick a specific style. There are no professional musicians that are masters at all styles. There is a specific reason for this; it would be far too complicated to master every musical form. This will require you to select a specific style of music that you are comfortable with and sticking to it as much as possible. Do you tend to favor a folksy style of singing? Perhaps you are more comfortable with a rock feel. You might even discover that you sing classically or even in an R&B style. Regardless of the style that you are most comfortable with you need to find it. All of your singing should be focused around the same genre as much as possible. From tone, to flow, to even song selection you are creating an entire package, make sure the package sounds perfect.

Your final tip would be staying modest. There are very few people who ever swear that they are the American Idol in the auditions. Most who are truly talented know just how stiff the competition is and they go in ready to work towards the prize. Those who are merely walking around with a huge ego tend to be lacking in the singing skills necessary to win and quickly find themselves on their way out. If you are certain that your singing is the best in the world, you should simply prove it by singing, rather than telling the judges that you are destined to be the next American Idol.



Audience’s Perception Of Songs

Audience’s Perception Of Songs

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Any songwriter knows that a song will not make it without having well-written music and perfectly crafted lyrics. But the interaction between music and lyrics in a song poses two questions. The first is which is more important and the second is which should be written first. Nevertheless, the second question is not truly an issue; as it is simply a matter of personal preference and habit. The question that really needs answering is in fact the first: “Which is more important? !”
To answer this question, we have to examine the audience perception of songs. Songs are written for people to hear them; therefore the way they identify with songs is most relevant and crucial to the songwriting process. A good songwriter should examine his/her audience beforehand and, consequently, shape the song to be as easily conceived as possible by its intended audience.
As I belong to western music by education (classical music) and to oriental music by birth (being from Egypt), I have examined -as deeply as I could- the perception of songs by both Arabic listeners and European listeners. My conclusion is that those two different cultures produced very differently biased people.
The Arabic culture and legacy is based heavily on poetry while music remained trivial. Consequently, for Arabic listeners the lyrics come first and music is reduced to a melodic vehicle for the lyrics with the least amount of arrangement possible. Lyrics come first for Arabic listeners!
On the other hand, Europe’s music heritage is enormous with a lot of genius composers who will always be remembered. At the same time, Europe’s great poets used the type of language that today needs a lot of simplification to understand. The music reaches the European listener before the lyrics!
So, does this mean that one can write “bad” lyrics for European listeners and get away with it?! Of course NOT!! They eventually catch up. Also, Arabic listeners will not listen to a song with bad music. The idea is that if your audiences care less for lyrics, then they wouldn’t “appreciate” a complex lyric. In fact, they wouldn’t understand it and will label it as “bad”. It has to be “good” but not “complex”. It’s all about complexity. Arabic listeners will settle down with a nice melody that fits the lyrics well. It has to be nice, but it CAN’T be complex!! My mother thinks that Dvorak’s “New World Symphony” is “louder” than music should be. I think she meant to say: “too complicated for music”. Conversely, European listeners will not settle for a nice melody, you have to have strong chord progressions, a powerful base line and a strong drum line.
So, I write more complicated lyrics for Arabic listeners and more complicated music for European listeners. Study YOUR OWN audiences and see what they like and to which side they are biased, so you know how to adjust your song’s complexity. But beware; sometimes “less complicated” means “more difficult to write”…Wish you simple songwriting! !



Romantic Songs for the date of your life

Dave Hause -8173
Source: Flickr

Songs tell a lot. They come in different genre. What have you come across a genre which is endless and immortal? Is it about friendship or hatred? Of course, almost all have the idea that LOVE is the most discussed, written and sung by different people- different voices. When dating out, what makes the date you have worth-cherishing?

Music has something to do with it. And music could eventually shape the mood of your date. Dating is such a great way of sifting your future lifetime partner. When you are out for a date, see to it that the music is just enticing and that it creates a mood for romance.

Man has composed almost all forms of songs but he writes love songs beautifully. Since the day the first love song was created, millions are indeed heart-melting. Songs of finding a new love, losing love, songs of inspiration, songs of moving on…songs about romance, the first times and the spurt of emotions.

With all due respect to all artists and fanatics, these are some of Romance songs which mean the tangle shared by two people in love during the most romantic date:

Truly, Madly, Deeply (Savage Garden) – this duo’s song speaks about an in-depth affection and promise to the person being loved.

“I’d be your dream
I’d be your wish…
I’d be your fantasy…
I’d be your hope…be your love…
Be everything that you need…”

This I Promise You (N’Sync) – this group made the airwaves filled with love. This song is really a pledge of a lifetime commitment. It is often used as wedding song.

“And I will take you in my arms
And hold you right where you belong
Until the day my life is through
This I promise you…”

Iris (Goo Goo Dolls) – the OST of City of Angels, it gained popularity not because of the movie alone but because the song pinches the heart.

“And I don’t want the world to see me
‘Cause I don’t think that they’d understand…
When everything’s made to be broken-
I just want you to know who I am.”

Dreaming’ of you (Selina) – the singer died but the song stays immortal. It is a light song but with a strong impact to one’s heart.

“I’m dreaming of you tonight
‘Til tomorrow
And for all of my life
And there’s nowhere in the world
I’d rather be…”

Songs will always be a part of courtship and it all starts with dating. If not, just a pat of an ignored expression of love. Music is the greatest invention man. Generations will continue to keep it rich. It will remind them of love and romance when they are here and grow up.



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